Recent research on dyslexia and other learning disabilities

When I started working with students who have learning disabilities back in 1990, the research on dyslexia was really starting to take off. Researchers had recently been able to pinpoint the sections of the brain that were involved through fMRI images and to refine their definition of dyslexia…

Dyslexie font – is it effective?

A friend recently sent me an article on a new font “designed to help dyslexics read” called Dyslexia. I love when my friends send me articles or ask me questions about dyslexia because it means I am spreading the word…

Anatomical Brain Differences Between Male and Female Dyslexics? More Fuel for the Gender Debate

New research shows there is an anatomical difference between the brains of males and females diagnosed with dyslexia…

Executive Functioning

We’ve heard and read a lot about the brain’s executive function capabilities throughout the years. Research has been exploring and defining executive function for decades now…

Technology and Dyslexia – Part 2

The Winter 2013 issue of Perspectives – a quarterly magazine published by IDA – delivered the second part of the technology discussion started in the fall of 2013. Here is our take on it…

Technology and Dyslexia – Part 1

The fall issue of Perspectives, (IDA’s quarterly publication), is devoted to technology and dyslexia. In fact, when the editors started sorting through the articles to consider they quickly decided it would take two issues to properly cover all the pertinent aspects of this subject…

Dyslexia might look like this in your child

Heather is a second-grader who loves to make up stories in her head or have her parents read to her. But learning to read has been a real struggle. She often substitutes similar words (home for house), makes the wrong sound for a letter (b for d), omits, adds or incorrectly sequences sounds (left for felt, sell for spell), or makes other random errors that just seem odd to her parents…

What we do really works – and the science proves it

Cutting edge science is confirming that intensive instruction can actually rewire the brain and achieve long-term results for dyslexic students and others.